About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN 7
CNNW 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
MSNBCW 2
CNN 1
CSPAN2 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
LINKTV 1
WJLA 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
't persuaded by that, but rather by the text of the constitution itself. now that the pentagon has lifted the ban on women in combat, oppons argue we could have problems with cohesion and combat readiness. it was a hot topic on the sunday morning shows. steve centanni has more. >> reporter: some say women are not strong enough for combat roles. others say they have proven themselves time and time again. it's official, women will be able to serve alongside men, opening up doors to advancement, along the military chain of command. outgoing defense secretary leon panetta signed that order last week. but many insist, this is a basic question of physical ability. >> i think the evidence is clear that combat effectiveness when women have put in those kine of demanding roles, they begin to break down. there is a difference in the physicality of women and men. they're not in the nfl. olympic athletes combeat by gender, not against each other. >> reporter: woeful have been serving in combat roles for years in iran iscprak afghanistan. and supporters say there have been no serious issues. nakts, so
house jobs to women. we are also looking at how the pentagon is planning to respond to north korea's new round of threats including nuclear tests and the vice president's sneaky strategy to try to pressure gun owners to support the administrations. pushing for new gun control laws. you are in "the situation room." . >>> we begin with the reshuffling at the white house. a few hours ago, president obama announced he is moving the deputy security adviser do into the position of white house chief of staff. today's big news as the president's clear response to complaints that women were not getting enough top level jobs. the white house correspondent has the latest information. jessica? update us on what's going on. it's a sensitive subject. >> it is. in choosing dennis mcdonough he chose comfort, friendship and trust over political pressure and the chance to make history that would have come for naming the first female chief of staff to the post. dennis donough is a long time trusted aid. here's what the president said when he announced the choice. >> i have been counting on dennis for nearl
and hollering in maryland. >> and uconn. go buy am my. 5:25. >>> still ahead, the pentagon is about to shatter the glass ceiling for women in the military. that story is coming up. >> plus, if the roads near you haven't been treated yet, you could be in for a long, slippery commute. 5:25. here's monika with an update. >> that means you're going to need to give yourself the extra time to deal with it. also, northbound 95, this seems to be the worst of it right now. early morning two separate accidents near dumfries road caused this delay coming up towards dumfries and then a little beyond into woodbridge as well. more on traffic coming up at >>> good morning. welcome back to wusa9. i'm andrea roane. >>> good morning. i'm mike hydeck. monika will have traffic in a moment and howard with the forecast. we'll start with the school delays and closings. >> these school districts are opening two hours late. anne arundel county in maryland, prince george's county in maryland and frederick county in maryland hoping two hours late. >> some of the closings. we have a longer list across the ticker on the b
of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a time of gradually reducing pentagon budgets. this will pay dividends for defense and to the family budget if the pentagon gets it right. it's clear that america is ready and equal to this challenge. the president has signaled his interests in leadership. the question is whether congress is equal to the challenge, ready with innovation, cooperation and leadership. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: mr. speaker, in a remote region of algeria at an oil and gas facility in the dark of night before the sun rose, workers from all over the world were getting ready to si
the rocketer which is referring to the pentagon's decision to lift the ban on women in combat roles. coming up on this edition of "the washington journal," we will be talking with kayla williams about the decision to lift the ban on combat roles. later we will take a look at the best and worst bosses on capitol hill. we will be right back after this break. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> if we turned away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> it is a bully pulpit and you have to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> a zero antennas come up and tell me when somebody has their own agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante. she is the only one he can trust. >> many women who were first ladies, a lot of them were riders. >> they are in many cases more interesting as human beings tha
year. >> because at the pentagon, the defense department has started laying off thousands of contract and some wear civilian workers. all were told that the agency is letting 46,000 people go. he is an effort to reduce spending, and had a possible mandatory budget cuts in march. if congress fails to reach a deal on deficit reduction, the military will be forced to reduce its budget by millions of dollars. >> the fda will not take any regulatory action against the pennsylvania college because of a vending machine that is selling the morning after pill. the machine dispenses a pill for $25 to students and university employees of shipping's bird university. administrators say that the ideal of the machine came from a student survey and was endorsed by the student government. >> the highs will only get up to the 50s today. futurecast 4 stays that of western will stay out perry there will be no 60's on the board is upper 50's for the south bay. about mid 50s for the delta perry ed about 55 for san leandro. downtown san francisco will get about 56 degrees. here's a look at your 7 day around
of the united states senate. you can build a pentagon three times in that time frame. it's time that -- to pass a budget out of the united states senate and senator reid should not be paid until it's done. the house has acted responsibly. we have met our deadlines, we have set our priorities, i was part of the house budget committee when we put together budgets that try to get our out-of-control spending under control and rein in our $16 trillion in debt. the sfat has not acted one time in that time frame. it's time to make the hard choices and do the work necessary to restore fiscal responsibility to washington. it's time for senator reid to pass a budget or withhold his paycheck. thank you, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. we'll have order in the chamber, please. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i
recruiter. i have gone to the pentagon in support of the secretary of -- i'm sorry, sergeant major of the army in the 1980's so i'm going to say this and quantify by saying, on a security level, i think secretary clinton handled this very well. in the history of the united states, so much information is being demanded, that breaches security for the department of defense and all the other agencies within the military that i don't think these senators are aware of what they are asking her to divulge. when you say, why wasn't the video available? some information i classified -- is classified to a certain degree that they can't release it immediately. when we have people on foreign soil, our soldiers and marines, their jobs are limited by the act here in the united states and they know they can't go out there and say, hey, you guys are waving these flags, get away or to shoot them. they can't do that. so, to me, naive attitude that the senators who asked those hard questions were asking -- ludicrous. no way they should have been allowed to give responses immediately or to have firsth
of wrongdoing by the pentagon. this, as jill kelly, the woman who triggered the investigation in the first place, speaks out for the first time. nbc's kerry sanders is outside kelly's home in tampa, florida, this morning. kerry, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, savannah. it's been three months since news broke of the secret love affair between general david petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell. it all came to light after jill kelly, who lives in the house over there, contacted the fbi about what she called threatening e-mails. throughout all of this, jill kelly has remained silent, until now. socialite jill kelly was thrown into the media spotlight last october as the story of general david petraeus and his affair with biographer paula broadwell unfolded. kelly was described in the media as the other, other woman. now she's telling her side of the story in an interview with a reporter for the daily beast, describing the ordeal as a living nightmare. >> jill kelly seemed to me to be someone who didn't quite know what hit her. she doesn't think she did anything wrong. her life has
cecilia vega is at the pentagon. everybody's getting warmed up there, as well, cecilia. >> reporter: aren't these guys great? how are you doing, george? good morning. we're having a great time out here. this is a staging area for all the marching bands that are going to participate today. 9,000 people marching in this parade, from every, single state around the country. these are my new friends from des moines. everybody say good morning, america. >> good morning, america. >> reporter: and their legs, they say, do not hurt. they're ready to march in this parade. we're going to see, not just marching bands and groups like these, floats from all over the country. they're ready to have a good time today, george. >> boy, des moines so important to the president. that's where he won the iowa caucuses in 2008. you see st. john's church, across the street from the white house. president obama and his family, get ready to attend their inaugural service. the president coming right now. he did that four years ago, as well. this is the church of presidents. every president since james madison has at
a budget that is completely taken up by entitlements in the pentagon. and that will be the only thing we're capable of funding. it's the only thing we'll be able to use the power of some progressive government to try to change. you can't be -- i don't think you can be a really good advocate for education, if at the same time, you also don't make a powerful argument to get our priorities in order and make sure that we're capable, as a society, of responding to what we need to, because we are not fixed into a budget math problem that is so intractable as senator coburn says, that we sort of just drive off the edge. >> and michael, we have no money for discretionary domestic spending to invest in education, infrastructure, r&d. >> right. >> the things that government, we've grown to expect government to do, if we don't take care of medicare and medicaid. we say it time and time again, yet i get politicians on this show that still pretend that you can take care of waste, fraud, and abuse. and we'll take care of it. and they'll be selling some of the spectacle. >> and foreign aid. >> yeah, le
"washington journal." then the senate confirmation hearing for john kerry. live coverage of the pentagon news conference with leon panetta and martin dempsey. and about 45 minutes, winnie stachelberg on gun control. max boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington tim
to the tune of i think around $89 billion that are going to be put on the pentagon and domestic spending. they're dumb cuts. we are not looking at specific programs in evaluating their worth and eliminating some and keeping others. we just like, chop. this is no way to budget for a nation, and i hope we can delay the sequester. but it's coming up soon. republicans have vowed they want even more cuts maybe in addition to the sequester to negotiate, and i think we should remind everybody we've already had $1.7 trillion in cuts and we just did $600 billion in new revenue. that's about $2.3 trillion, mr. speaker, and, you know, how much more -- how much more cutting do we need to do, particularly when we talk about vital programs for americans? so, mr. speaker, i think if we're going to do cuts we should cut things that we really don't need. for example, medicare part d, passed in 2003, prohibits medicare from negotiating drug prices with the pharmaceutical companies. now, the veterans administration does negotiate for drug prices all the time, but medicare is prohibited from doing so. basically i
- ago question: is there a nonviolent peacemaking army that can shut down the pentagon? and you challenged us to breathe in bernard haring's words: the materialistic growth--mania for more and more production and more and more markets for selling unnecessary and even damaging products is a sin against the generation to come what shall we leave to them: rubbish, atomic weapons numerous enough to make the earth uninhabitable, a poisoned atmosphere, polluted water? "love in practice is a harsh and dreadful thing compared to love in dreams," said a russian writer. now i know at great cost martin that as we burn something moves out of the flames (call it spirit or apparition) till no fire or body or ash remain we breathe out and smell the world again aye-aye-aye ayo-ayo-ayo ayeee- ayeee-ayeee amen men men men awoman woman woman woman men men men woman woman woman men men woman woman men woman womanmen. the earth has tilted, tear martin, as the wicked each morning to an internal alarm clock called hope, i count the morning stars, the air so sweet anointing the day, hope comes on warni
lines to the white house situation room, the national military command center at the pentagon and the cia's op center. having worked as an officer, i know that any information that indicates a threat overseas is mentioned above. if the message is received, it is the officer's job to make sure that other agencies are informed. i would like to present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost, what was going on at the ops center in the state department while the consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> we can give you greater detail but it is as you described, the place for communications to go in and out. they were placing calls, receiving calls, deeply engaged in trying to help us. they help us require information so we can respond in real time. >> 7 hours, there should have been a response. white the delay when it was immediately known that it was? >> i would say that we described the attack, i described the attack the next morning, the president called it an act of terror. as you read in the classified and unclassified version, there were a lot of questions abo
to the white house situation room, the national military command center the pentagon and cia op center. having worked as a watch center in the information that has a threat to the safety of citizens overseas is passed through other agencies mentioned above. if it is of significant message concerning american interest is received, it is the watch officers, to ensure that these other agencies are informed. he goes on there are many other questions that need to be answered and i would present these questions on his behalf. first and foremost was going on at the office of the department in washington while our consulate was under attack for seven hours? >> well, we can certainly give you greater detail, but the center as you have described, you know it is the place communications goes in and out. they were receiving calls, they were deeply engaged in trying to help us. they don't reach out on their own but to help us acquire information so that we can respond in real time. >> in seven hours, goodness gracious there should have the response. why did labeling the attack as terrorism immediately know
of war is -- jay johnson, the general kuns counsel of the pentagon, gave a speech about thinking about ending that war. we think about iraq and afghanistan. the hot wars. boots on the grounds wars. the broader framework of war under which we labor through the amf i agree with you the odds are slim that we're going to see a repeal of that, an end to that, but i think it's a place for the conversation to go in the second term as the president headed towards withdrawal with afghanistan and the physical presence we have of u.s. soldiers. >> as we start to understand what an obama foreign policy is. i mean, you look back at the first inaugural just compared with the second inaugural address. the first inaugural address was about ending the era of bush and cheney. that's really what it was about. it was about we're going to do this in i different way. if you unclench your fist. it's a different time now. he has to figure out what he is going to do affirmatively, not in reaction to the way somebody else did it that he disapproved of. >> look at the change in personnel. to go from gates to hil
to the pentagon, kerry to the state department and is lew as chief of staff. andrea mitchell, back outside. >> as people are leaving here, those nominations are pretty much expected to go through. of course, chuck hagel has been the most controversial. but this is really a cabinet and our friends doris kearns goodwin, of course, really has written so eloquently about the team of rivals approach of the first obama cabinet and the parallels, of course, to abraham lincoln. we think so much about lincoln today. we think about martin luther king jr. today and the all of the echos of equal rights that came through in the speech. but this is going to be a cabinet not of rivals, but of friends and colleagues, of very close colleagues and we see what we are expecting next, of course, janice mcdonough to be chief of staff. i think the president has a comfort level with these people and the question will be whether he listens to outside voices. he says he has huge challenges, but i thought that the tone of this speech was, aside from the policy prescriptions, much more eloquent than i had expected, f
issues, particularly gay rights, were settled during his first term, when at the pentagon and throughout all military service, "don't ask, don't tell" was ended under his watch and he embraced formally for the first time gay marriage across the country. what arguments are to be settled for fought for in the future? climate change, immigration and tax reform among others. the president did at one point in his speech say there are some parts of government that need to be reformed, but our usefulness of one small olive branch to republicans. but we are not a nation of takers and the fundamental foundations of the great society, medicare, medicaid and social security will be preserved under his watch and the encroachments republicans would like to make on those programs from the president's perspective in the name of deficit reduction will be, if not repelled, at least resisted. scott? >> major, thank you very much. this is the crowd in washington, d.c., live, as they begin to wander away from the national mall, after witnessing american history firsthand. during the president's first inaugu
was a sergeant, whom he believes comes at the pentagon from the view of the bottom of the ladder, not at the top of the ladder. and so i think you're going to have some real issues. >> general stanley mcchrystal wrote about that actually in his new book. he talked about the deficit of trust they had early on in the administration. let's go back to wolf, who is waiting down by the white house, down by the parade grounds. wolf? >> you can see the presidential limo, anderson, just beginning to move slowly. you see the secret service van right behind that presidential limo there. obviously very tight security. the vice president is there, and the president and the first lady. they are being accompanied by what is initially called the presidential escort. these are the parades, performing groups organized into five division, each led by one branch of the u.s. armed forces, the army, the marine corps, the navy and the air force and yes, the coast guard as well, even though the coast guard is part of the department of homeland security, not a part of the department of defense. it is one of the five bra
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)